INSIGHTS & RESOURCES

HERG is regularly called upon to provide public commentary for the government, newspaper, and more.

Check out our latest thinking on the issues that matter most in Australia’s higher education system.

FEATURED INSIGHT

There is growing anticipation that the federal government’s response to the Universities Accord review’s final report will come soon. Given this and the fact that the budget is less than a month away, it is timely to review one of the final report’s key insights.

Explainers

The Higher Education and Research Group releases working papers in the form of ‘Explainers’.

These documents are designed to be a short descriptions of key issues relevant to the higher education sector focusing particularly on measurement issues relating to university costs, cost and labour efficiency in both teaching and research and university productivity over time.

You will find the valuable information availbale for downloads below.

The joint and common cost problem arises where there are two or more outputs that arise from costs that are shared in the production of these outputs. In many situations, the ability to assign costs to these two or more outputs is not complex. But there are instances where it is highly complex. In these situations, there is a need to use advanced analytics to provide a valid and reliable estimate of costs.

The need to measure costs and productivity in higher education is crucial for the effective and efficient use of resources.

More Insights & Resources

There is growing anticipation that the federal government’s response to the Universities Accord review’s final report will come soon. Given this and the fact that the budget is less than a month away, it is timely to review one of the final report’s key insights.

Recently released analysis finds that one large Group of Eight university outperformed other public universities in its research and education productivity outcomes during the pandemic.

The joint and common cost problem arises where there are two or more outputs that arise from costs that are shared in the production of these outputs. In many situations, the ability to assign costs to these two or more outputs is not complex. But there are instances where it is highly complex. In these situations, there is a need to use advanced analytics to provide a valid and reliable estimate of costs.

The need to measure costs and productivity in higher education is crucial for the effective and efficient use of resources.

Last week in The Australian, Australian National University economics professors Bruce Chapman and Rabee Tourky reignited a debate about a levy on international student tuition revenue (“Universities should pay levy on ‘foreign student industry’ ”, 15/11).

For several weeks, those interested in higher education have been contemplating the interim report of the Universities Accord review. The report makes many insightful and far-reaching observations. Undoubtedly it will be a turning point for important aspects of the educational offerings within our public universities.

It’s now virtually certain that the South Australian Legislative Council, the state’s upper house, will initiate a parliamentary inquiry into the planned merger of the state’s two largest universities.

For several years economist Keith Houghton, a former business and economics dean at the Australian National University, has been gathering data on the productivity performance of Australian universities to give a picture of the efficiency of their research and the efficiency of their teaching.

Erica Wilson and Thomas Roche provide a rich description of changes in teaching and learning at Southern Cross University involving the newly introduced “Block” mode teaching model (CMM November 25).

The University of Melbourne is facing a massive budget deterioration of nearly $600m this year, driven by a collapse in investment income and the growing cost of post-pandemic recovery.

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